Øyvind Holmstad

169    581

Kjøpesenterkulturen (CC Gjøvik)

CC Gjøvik, et trist eksempel på norsk kjøpesenter-"kultur".

Publisert: 11. jan 2012 / 1980 visninger.

Original artikkel hos Permaliv her. Artikkelen er tidligere publisert hos The Permaculture Research Institute of Australia og hos Energy Bulletin, USA.

A Multilayered Anti-Pattern

"The problem is that we are adapting to the wrong things — to images, or to short-term greed, or to the clutter of mechanics. These maladaptations are known as “antipatterns” — a term coined not by Alexander, but by software engineers. An antipattern is something that does things wrong, yet is attractive for some reason (profitable or easy in the short term, but dysfunctional, wasteful of resources, unsustainable, unhealthy in the long term). It also keeps re-appearing. Sounds like our economy and wasteful lifestyle?" - Michael Mehaffy and Nikos Salingaros

CC Gjøvik, an example of a multilayered antipattern

The permaculture focus is on tracking patterns in nature and design, to create pleasure for ourselves and to find good examples for the world. Patterns work in a multitude of connections with their surroundings, and the more connections there are, the richer are the pattern languages the patterns are part of.

Unfortunately, although our pattern languages might have a deep poetry, not all people feel attracted to their harmony (meaning "the quality without a name"). Today’s disconnected people are attracted by antipatterns, this is because they are profitable or easy in the short term, and human nature is greedy and lazy. We are short term thinkers — in a world of competition the winner takes it all, and today’s capitalism is all about materialism.

Antipatterns are dysfunctional, wasteful of energy and resources, unsustainable and unhealthy in the long term, and they violate the human scale. Still, they are so seductive in their grand scale, and we are overwhelmed by their appearance and shiny surfaces. In fact, we have even made them our new temples!

Entering the consumerist temple

Further, antipatterns are disconnected, anti-fractal and non-adapted, the opposite of natural systems. With patterns found in nature and traditional culture we can identify three characteristics:

Some think that we can change the world through wonderful patterns and pattern languages — like the way we feel attracted to a meadow of flowers we can’t understand how people can resist such beauty. But how many meadows are bulldozed for profit and ease? In this world harmony and balance come second to greed and speed. We can’t change human nature, so what we should do is to identify, fight and prohibit antipatterns. If not these antipatterns will sooner or later strangle and eliminate our living patterns, as they are fed with immense amounts of capital, energy and resources.

This doesn’t mean we should not create a lot of permaculture projects around the world. We should! We need them as positive examples to contrast the antipatterns, so that people can see and understand how insane they are, and can see that alternatives exist. But we cannot expect permaculture technology to conquer the world before antipatterns are fought back!

Another sign of antipatterns is that they look the same around the world, because they are forced structures created out of a blueprint. Patterns on the contrary always attempt a new shape, adapting to local conditions. 


This shopping mall in Poland has the same attention-getting expression as the shopping mall of my town in the top picture, identifying them both as antipatterns. To quote Michael Mehaffy and Nikos Salingaros: "While the initial prices might appear cheap, the real cost is deferred until much later, in the “externalities” of environmental degradation, social isolation and decay of long-term quality of life." Photo: Gaz777, Wikimedia Commons.

The shopping mall of my town consists of several antipatterns, making it a multilayered antipattern. To call it an antipattern language makes no sense, as clusters of antipatterns doesn’t create languages, just noise, keeping no information about life and what it means to be a human being. I have identified four antipatterns of the mall CC Gjøvik, which are all contrasted by an Alexandrine pattern from A Pattern Language.

Antipattern 1, contrasted in the Alexandrine pattern 87, Individually Owned Shops:

Problem
When shops are too large, or controlled by absentee owners, they become plastic, bland, and abstract.

Solution
Do what you can to encourage the development of individually owned shops. Approve applications for business licenses only if the business is owned by those people who actually work and manage the store. Approve new commercial building permits only if the proposed structure includes many very very small rental spaces.

The problem with CC Gjøvik is not just that the shops are too large, but the mall itself is far too large — it might be the largest shopping mall between Oslo and Trondheim. It is situated just outside the core of central town, like a big sponge leaving the town center like lifeless dry land. And not just the town, but villages from all over the region, as everybody wants to go to the largest shopping mall around Lake Mjøsa. It’s like a magnet tapping the surrounding economies for much needed capital.

In America they have come up with a great idea, Small Marts. This is splendid, but for them to thrive antipatterns like CC Gjøvik need to be erased. Unfortunately, for the time it’s growing, just like uncontrolled cancer, recently adding another 7000 square meters.

Pattern 87 is described extensively in my earlier PRI-article: The Ancient Taberna in a Future World.

Antipattern 2, contrasted in the Alexandrine pattern 22, Nine Per Cent Parking:

Problem
Very simply - when the area devoted to parking is too great, it destroys the land.

Solution
Do not allow more than 9 per cent of the land in any given area to be used for parking. In order to prevent the "bunching" of parking in huge neglected areas, it is necessary for a town or a community to subdivide its land into "parking zones" no larger than 10 acres each and to apply the same rule in each zone.


My dream is that this can someday be transformed from a car park into the Lake Mjøsa Park, or in Norwegian "Mjøsparken"

Antipattern 3, contrasted in the Alexandrine pattern 104, Site Repair:

Problem
Buildings must always be built on those parts of the land which are in the worst condition, not the best.

Solution
On no account place buildings in the places which are most beautiful. In fact, do the opposite. Consider the site and its buildings as a single living eco-system. Leave those areas that are the most precious, beautiful, comfortable, and healthy as they are, and build new structures in those parts of the site which are least pleasant now.


Although it was a sawmill on the site where CC Gjøvk was built, to where timber was transported with barges from around the lake, this place should have been transformed into something much more valuable than a shopping mall — to something like a park, to increase the contact between the town and the lake. I don’t see any possibility for transformation here, but rather just the eradication of this maladapted mall is appropriate, after which we can worship queen Mjøsa rather than king Mammon.

Queen Mjøsa seen from Eiktunet, a small folk museum of Gjøvik. Rather than worshiping her with parks and beauty, my town is constantly mocking her with hostile structures down by her shores.

Antipattern 4, contrasted in the Alexandrine pattern 25, Access to Water:

Problem
People have a fundamental yearning for great bodies of water. But the very movement of the people toward the water can also destroy the water.

Problem
When natural bodies of water occur near human settlements, treat them with great respect. Always preserve a belt of common land, immediately beside the water. And allow dense settlements to come right down to the water only at infrequent intervals along the water's edge.


Does this treat Norway’s largest inland body of water with respect? The picture is taken from the second level at CC Gjøvik. In the background you can see industry and the highway RV. 4 down by the lake, and a glimpse of Lake Mjøsa itself behind all this, to the left.

If there is something the politicians of Gjøvik have been very clever to do, it is making barriers between the town and the lake, separating people from the greatest inspiration for living here, Lake Mjøsa — like the triple barrier of CC Gjøvik, the parking areas and the RV. 4 highway. How could my politicians establish a highway down by the shores of Lake Mjøsa? The answer is that they see the world as parts, not as wholes. Soon the whole town will consist of parts only. How can one then be whole as a human being?

When the politicians and bureaucrats decided to separate my town from Lake Mjøsa by constructing a highway down by it's shores, they also layed the foundation for a shopping mall to be established here

At the back side of CC Gjøvik, toward Strandgata (the "beach street" in English, although the beach can no longer be seen). From this parody of an "arcade" you can really feel the "technology of death".

To deal with all these antipatterns of our world we need strong tools. These tools are to be found in the radical technology of Christopher Alexander. Read about these technologies in the great essays by Michael Mehaffy and Nikos Salingaros in Metropolis Magazine, they are all to be found here.

In spite of the despair I feel when confronted with such a life-destroying, inhuman and unsustainable antipattern like CC Gjøvik, Christopher Alexander gives me hope for a radically new future. A future where antipatterns are not the common, but a future dominated by deeply rooted and strongly interconnected permaculture patterns and languages.

Svar

Bli med i debatten!

Skriv gjerne ditt synspunkt! Du må være registrert med fullt navn, og innlogget for å delta. Sett deg inn i retningslinjene. Brudd på dem kan føre til utestengning.
Vennlig hilsen Alf Gjøsund, religions- og debattredaktør Vårt Land

Skriv kommentar
Kommentar #1

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

Big Box Power Centers

Publisert over 5 år siden

Et godt navn på denne typen kjøpesentre, ala CC Gjøvik, er "big box power centers".

Svar
Kommentar #2

Knut Nygaard

483 innlegg  6640 kommentarer

Øyvind

Publisert over 5 år siden

Jeg bodde på Gjøvik i perioden 1981-93 og opplevde, som de fleste av innbyggerne, det som stort pluss å få en kjøpesenter som CC.  Jeg kan ikke erindre at det var noen stor dissens om dette hverken med tanke på konkurransen med det øvrige forretningsliv eller plasseringen.

Opplever at den miljøbeskrivelse og de ankepunkter du kommer med som "dine" og ikke de som var "hvermansen" sin opplevelse av å få et kjøpesenter å forholde seg plassert akkurat der.  Senere har jeg sett at Gjøvik har satt mer pris på sin plassering ved Mjøskanten og lagt an friarealer i retning syd.

Den største utfordringen har nok forretningene i det øvrige bybildet.  Natur og helhetsmessig finner ikke jeg at CC har bidratt til å forringe inntrykket, men- trolig hadde det vært mer liv i det opprinnelige sentrum.

Vi flyttet til Bergen og på en måte så kan du si at vi flyttet fra CC til Lagunen.  Legger inn et bilde av noen svært kreative planer som kunne ha vært verdt en grundig uttalelse..

 Lagunen-området har i dag 61.000 kvadratmeter med forretninger. I planen som Fanaposten har fått tilgang til, åpnes det for ytterligere 74.000 kvadratmeter. (Illustrasjonsbilde)



 
Planen åpner for mer enn en dobling av handelsarealet i Lagunen-området, i tillegg til stor utbygging av boliger inne på området. Lagunen-området har i dag 61.000 kvadratmeter med forretninger. I planen åpnes det for ytterligere 74.000 kvadratmeter. Det meste av denne utvidelsen vil komme i det som i dag er Lagunen og Laguneparken:

• Noen få av disse forretningene er planlagt i det nye senterområdet på Kalganehaugen, som i hovedsak vil være viet til boligbygg.

• Rema 1000 har planer om 5000 kvadratmeter dagligvarebutikk på vest-

siden av Fanavegen.

• Forretningsarealet i Laguneparken forventes økt med 15.000 kvadrat-

meter handel. I disse byggene vil det i hovedsak være forretninger i første etasje, mens det planlegges store boligblokker i etasjene over.

• Lagunen storsenter planlegges å få tre etasjer med forretninger, og senteret vil i fremtiden bestå av to adskilte bygg som vil få en gågate mellom seg og en gangbro mellom de to byggene.

Fire områder

Planen deler Rådal inn i fire områder, som alle vil gjennomgå store forandringer.

• På Kalganehaugen planlegges det boligområde med kontor/forretningsområde inn mot Fanavegen og bybanestoppet. Det vurderes mulighet for barnehage nord på Kalganehaugen.

• Lagunen storsenter skal være «episenteret» i området, og eneste del av området som ikke får boliger.

• Laguneparken blir et byformet område med forretninger, servicetilbud og boliger i en kvartalssturktur. Området rundt Råtjønn skal beholdes som grøntareal og de eksiterende boligområdene i sør vil beholdes.

• På motsatt side av motorvegen, i nærheten av Rå skole og Rå barnehage foreslås det å bygge ut bygg som kobinerer bolig/kontor og forretning og et park & ride-anlegg.

Mange boliger

Rådal sentrum vil i fremtiden få anslagsvis 700 nye boliger. Dette innebærer 70.000 kvadratmeter bolig innenfor senterområdet. Det planlegges en rekke såkalte bykvartaler med forretninger i første etasje og 4-5 etasjers boligblokker oppå, men de høyeste byggene vil kunne bli på hele ni etasjer.

Innimellom byggene planlegges det ulike byrom, deriblant et nordre og et nedre torg med en såkalt bybaneallmenning som binder dem sammen. Det planlegges bydelspark ved Apeltunvatnet, der det ifølge utkastet til plan kan være aktuelt med badeplass eller festplass.

Vekker oppsikt

Lagunen-planen er et resultat av et samarbeid mellom Lagunen Eiendom som den største grunneieren og Bergen kommune. Bakgrunnen er bystyrevedtaket fra juni 2007, da det ble vedtatt å utvide senterområdet rundt Lagunen slik at det blant annet innlemmet boligområdet på Kalganehaugen i det fremtidige senterområdet.

I etterkant av dette vedtaket inviterte kommunen flere arkitektkontorer til å lage sine skisser av fremtidens Rådal. Resultatene som ble lagt frem i 2010 var oppsiktsvekkende og foreslo blant annet store grep for å tilbakeføre noe av landskapet som måtte vike da senterområdet i sin tid ble bygget.

– Lagunen har vokst frem som et handelssenter, og vi kommer ikke utenom at handel må stå sentralt i fremtiden. Men vi ønsker oss et mer mangfoldig tilbud med byrom, park og gangakser. Det trengs møteplasser for folk utenom det å handle. Lagunen har i dag en skole på hver side, og etter min mening må barn og unge stå i sentrum, uttalte daværende byråd for byutvikling Lisbeth Iversen til Fanaposten da skissene ble lagt ut på høring i fjor.

Slik jeg leser disse planene, så er det kjøpesenteret som setter premissene og bomassen og det øvrige liv i nærmiljøet styrer av planarbeidet - konsekvensene  ser en gjerne først etter noen år.....

Blir ikke CC noe mindre truende enn Lagunespøkelset, Øyvind?

Svar
Kommentar #3

Knut Nygaard

483 innlegg  6640 kommentarer

Bildet - Laguneparken

Publisert over 5 år siden
Svar
Kommentar #4

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

Knut

Publisert over 5 år siden

Huff, det var noen forferdelige bokser på det bildet, ikke mye organisk nei. Dessverre er det ikke kun Gjøvik det har gått nedoverbakke for de siste hundre år, dette gjelder i høyeste grad også Bergen: BEFORE/AFTER

Når det gjelder Gjøviks byhistorie vil jeg gjengi fra et leserbrev av Einar Grastvedt i OA:

År 2011 vil Gjøvik kunne feire 150 år med bystatus. I den anledning er det ytret ønske om en ny historiebok for Gjøvik, siden det er 50 år siden den første jubileumsboka; På Fedres gamle veger, ført i pennen av redaktør Reidar Mollgård, ble til. Mye vann er rent i Mjøsa siden den gang, og det kan være fornuftig å komplettere historien. Det kan sikkert bli interessant for nye generasjoner å få innblikk i hva byens fedre har maktet på godt og vondt siden 1961. I dag er det ikke vanskelig å forutsi at på den negative siden vil et skammens kapittel nødvendigvis bli viet stor oppmerksomhet. Det gjelder byens ansvarlige ledere, de politisk valgte representanter og de fastlønnedes administrative forvaltning og behandling av Gjøviks fasade, strandsonen og kontakten med Mjøsa. 

Helt siden 1902, da jernbanen ble lagt på fylling fra den sagnomsuste ”Kilebanehaugen” (en katastrofe i seg selv), og raseringen av den vakre furulunden, har dette vært et tema i alle senere debatter om disponering og bevaring av strandsonen og kontakten med Mjøsa. Stikkordet har alltid vært: Aldri mer vannskjøtting og rasering eller bebyggelse ved strandsonen. 

Men hva har skjedd? Jo, etter gjennomføringen av storkommunen, og kommunestyret stort sett ble bestående av representanter fra de omkringliggende bygdekommuner, kom bysamfunnets problemer og behov mer og mer i bakleksa. Og når vegmyndigheter og andre offentlige instanser presset på, var det få som kunne eller var villige til å støtte selve kjernen i kommunen av de fra landkommunene valgte representanter. I forbindelse med anlegget av Riksveg 4 og plasseringen på Mjøsstranda sa eksempelvis Kåre Haugen fra øverst i Snertingdalen at de bare betraktet det som en veg for dem å komme til Gjøvik, tross underskriftsprotester med mer enn 4000 – to ganger! 

Det samme skjedde med videreføring av vegen. For i det hele tatt å komme ut av byen, ble eneste løsningen å legge vegen langs Hunnselva forbi Hunton, elverket og under Nybrua fra 1937. Det var for øvrig ingeniør Fredrik Selmers mesterstykke, og sto som modell på ”Vi kan”-utstillingen i Oslo i 1938. Men, myndighetene forlangte brua revet, Huntonfossen og elva tørrlagt, og en praktfull canyon, formet etter tusenårig erosjon, ble ødelagt. Det hadde vært mulig å legge vegen under brua, slik at både elva og fossen med canyon ble bevart, men også denne gang nei. Tross 5016 notariale bekreftede underskrifter og fakkeltog fra brua og ned til rådhuset. Etter planen skulle brua, som måtte rives, erstattes av en enkel gangbru. Men etter massive krav fra ambulanse, brannvesen og drosjer om kjørebru, grep Fylkesmannen inn, og nærmest ga ordre om skikkelig kjørebru. Den brua som da ble bygd, kostet vegmyndighetene mange ganger omkostningene som bevaring av den gamle brua fra 1937 ville medført. Slik mistet Gjøvik nok en verneverdig attraksjon, med canyon, elv og fossefall, slik det pleier å gå når makta rår. 

I forbindelse med debatten om riksveganlegget i Engelandsvika, med 1 kilometer strand, sa en annen representant fra utkantkommunen at Engelandsvika var ikke til noe allikevel, så der kunne vegen godt legges. I det hele tatt førte kommunesammenslutningen til at forståelse for og hensyntagen til bysentrets spesielle behov og særpreg ble vanskeligere etter hvert. - Einar Grastvedt

Som vi alle vet har plasseringen av Riksveg 4 langsetter Mjøsstranda medført etableringen av mange malplasserte vederstyggeligheter i strandsona, som bensinstasjoner, Plantasjen med parkeringsarealer opptar vel omtrent det kvarte av Huntonstranda, og ikke minst etableringen av CC Mart’n med tilhørende parkeringsarealer og biltrafikk. Den livlige campingplassen på Vikodden har blitt fortrengt av blokkbebyggelse, og renseanlegget ble plassert nederst mot Mjøsa i den grøntkorridoren som gikk fra Mjøsa opp til Marka. Det siste er at Viken Folkehøgskole har solgt unna nærmere 10 mål av sitt område til en boligspekulant, for å finansiere oppussing og utbygging. Riktignok ble området i Fredevika noe utvidet når travbanen flyttet til Biri, men dette har mer enn blitt oppspist andre steder.

Når det gjelder plasseringen av CC Gjøvik var det vel ikke så rart ikke så mange protesterte, det nyttet jo ikke å protestere mot vegen noen år forut, og med veien var jo området allerede ødelagt. Det er jo også en koloss av et kjøpesenter vi ser i dag, imot i sin barndom.

Det aller tristeste er allikevel kanskje at de vakre fossefallene i Hunnselva ble lagt under asfalt når RV. 4 skulle ut igjen av byen.

Svar
Kommentar #5

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

An Architecture for Our Time

Publisert over 5 år siden

Dette innlegget av Charles Siegel redegjør på en glimrende måte for dagens situasjon: An Architecture for Our Time

Svar
Kommentar #6

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

Charles Siegels erklæring

Publisert over 5 år siden

Jeg finner også Charles Siegels erklæring på hans hjemmeside meget aktuell for temaet:

"Today, most people recognize that modernization and growth can harm the natural environment. The Preservation Institute believes that modernization also damages the social environment - that many of our social problems are side-effects of modernization and economic growth.

To preserve the natural environment and the social environment, we must modernize selectively. Factory mass production is an efficient way of producing most goods that used to be made by hand. But we are in danger of using the same centralized, standardized methods for every aspect of life, from housing to retail shopping to child care.

Inappropriate modernization threatens the natural environment and also threatens:

Communities: Small towns and urban neighborhoods have been replaced with anonymous shopping malls and impersonal tract housing. We believe in preserving existing neighborhoods and small towns that are still intact - as in Vermont, where there is a movement to keep out Walmart and other chains to protect Main Street businesses. And we believe in restoring old-fashioned neighborhoods and towns that have already been damaged - as in the Hayes Valley district of San Francisco, where the neighborhood revived when the state tore down the Central Freeway. Small Businesses: Independently run small businesses have been replaced by superstores and chains. For example, McDonalds, Burger King, and a few other giant corporations dominate the restaurant business. Often, chains are no more efficient than independent retailers: they control the market only because they can do more advertising. We believe there should be laws limiting on the number of stores that a single chain may control, to break up the big retail chains. Families: School systems have taken over much of the working of raising children, and now day care centers are raising even the smallest children. We believe in school voucher systems, to give parents a say over their own children's education. And we believe in reversing the growth of day care, by giving families who raise their own children subsidies equal to the subsidies for day care and by giving parents more flexible work hours. Personal Responsibility: During the twentieth century, centralized technocratic organizations also took over purely personal choices and responsibilities. For example, Health Maintenance Organizations and insurancers Medicare now make most decisions about individuals' health care. We believe in giving people more choice and more responsibility for these decisions.

Modernization has not been as effective as people expected during most of the twentieth century, because in the United States and the other developed nations, the average person already has enough, and continued economic growth provides trivial benefits. As we show in our policy study The End of Economic Growth, Americans would be better off if they had the opportunity to work shorter hours, consume less, and do more for themselves.

Which way will we go in the coming century?

If we continue on the path of blind modernization and growth, we will have a flood of new products, many of them useless. We will also have continuing environmental breakdown, as global warming becomes more severe, and continuing social breakdown, as technocratic control makes small groups and individuals more powerless.

If we modernize selectively, we can produce an abundance of useful products. We can also have enough leisure time for ourselves, our families, and our communities. We can have a stable environment. And we can have a balanced society that has room for the modern economy but also has room for civil society, families, and individuals to do for themselves." - Charles Siegel

Svar
Kommentar #7

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

Small Marts hjemmeside

Publisert over 5 år siden

Jeg omtaler Small Marts i artikkelen, nå viser det seg at de også har sin egen hjemmeside: http://small-mart.org/

Svar
Kommentar #8

Øyvind Holmstad

169 innlegg  581 kommentarer

Goodbye Supermarkets!

Publisert over 5 år siden
Svar

Lesetips

Les flere

Siste innlegg

Les flere

Siste kommentarer

Njål Kristiansen kommenterte på
Forsone seg med 22. juli
rundt 5 timer siden / 1174 visninger
Kåre Kvangarsnes kommenterte på
Polariseringens pris
rundt 5 timer siden / 156 visninger
Georg Bye-Pedersen kommenterte på
Forsone seg med 22. juli
rundt 6 timer siden / 1174 visninger
Oddbjørn Johannessen kommenterte på
Polariseringens pris
rundt 6 timer siden / 156 visninger
Randi TunIi kommenterte på
Er Gud urettferdig - tier Gud i dag - skjuler Gud seg?
rundt 6 timer siden / 183 visninger
Knut Nygaard kommenterte på
Polariseringens pris
rundt 7 timer siden / 156 visninger
Kåre Kvangarsnes kommenterte på
Polariseringens pris
rundt 7 timer siden / 156 visninger
Asbjørn E. Lund kommenterte på
Intelligent Design kontra darwinisme
rundt 7 timer siden / 6189 visninger
Njål Kristiansen kommenterte på
Forsone seg med 22. juli
rundt 7 timer siden / 1174 visninger
Georg Bye-Pedersen kommenterte på
Forsone seg med 22. juli
rundt 8 timer siden / 1174 visninger
Hermod Herstad kommenterte på
Forsone seg med 22. juli
rundt 8 timer siden / 1174 visninger
Les flere